Indian IT Series- Part 1 – Effective Management

After working for nearly five years in the Indian Software Industry, I think its high time I should scribble about some of the findings I made during my career so far. Hopefully this comes as the first part of the series, which I titled as “Indian IT Series”. A foreward to all who may read this :: These writings contain viewpoint from a software developer and its not intended to hurt anyone.

This episode, I am gonna tell my opinion about the Management Tier of this industry. I believe that this is the main tier which have a major impact of the outcome of a company or a project. I think I am not at a level to tell any opinion about the management of a company, rather I would love to explode my thinking on project level management or the level just above that. Fortunately or unfortunately, I had worked under both type of managers : the best and the worst. Also I had undergone two entirely different IT cultures :: restriction oriented and freedom oriented :: Kerala and Bangalore. 🙂

Some DOs that developers expecting from a Manager :

  • Give adequate creative freedom
  • Act as a filter, which filters out the pressure coming from above
  • Appreciate all the good work
  • Understand the capabilities of the developer and stand with them
  • Support them in whatever situations possible
  • Do support them in case they are stretching beyond working hours
  • Be friendly and open
  • Bring maximum transparency to the team
  • Be honest and talk on face
  • Share the responsibilities with your petty developers
  • Try to implement a flexible working hours possible
  • Be an understanding manager
  • Even though any of your member make an error, make them aware of that, train them and give them another oppurtunity.

Some DONTs that developers dont want from a Manager :

  • Don’t bug them frequently by asking the status every 5 minutes
  • Don’t induce un-necessary restrictions, this will change their attitude
  • Don’t involve them in to0 much junk work like process documents and timesheets
  • Don’t fingerpoint your developers
  • Don’t act friendly and then stab on their back
  • Don’t blame your developer in front of an audience and there by humiliating them
  • Don’t question the developers on the time they are spending
  • Don’t force developers to stretch, just explain the need of sitting late.
  • Don’t expect developers to stretch everyday, they are as human as you

These are the points that come from the top of my head. Interestingly, I collected these points from my colleagues and hence I think this is a true expectation from the developers.

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